Muskogee Phoenix Warns of Bobcat Fever

The Muskogee Phoenix has issued a warning article to residents in the area:

Dr. Larry Hamilton of Honor Heights Veterinary Clinic, 4011 W. Okmulgee Ave., said he normally had seen one or two cases a year. “This past month, I diagnosed 12,” he said.

The disease is a parasite, feline cytauxzoonosis, carried by ticks that have fed on wild bobcats, which are known reservoirs for the disease.

The parasite does not affect humans, dogs, or other animals other than cats, veterinarians say.

Cats with the parasite develop a high fever and become lethargic or anorectic, Hamilton said.

“They do not want to eat,” he said. “Very few survive the disease.”

Hamilton said it takes an hour or two for the tick to infect a cat.

via Muskogee Phoenix

Prevention is key to keeping cats safe. Use Flea/Tick medications for ALL your pets.

“If your cat likes to stay in the yard, try to keep your grass mowed down so it’s not tall,” she said. “The ticks tend to like the taller grasses. Keep the shrubbery trimmed short and remove debris around your house. Do daily tick checks on the cats and remember to look between their toes. If your cat lives with a dog, make sure you are using some type of tick control on the dog as it can bring ticks into your house, which can then feed on your cat.”

via Science Daily

130624103807_1_900x600

via Science Daily

According to the Companion Animal Council, the disease is most often observed “between March and September, when the tick vectors are active.”

Where is Cytauxzoon felis found?
The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, is considered to be the main vector ofcytauxzoon felis. The disease has been found in the states of:

  • Texas
  • Arkansas
  • Louisiana
  • Virginia
  • Kansas
  • North Carolina
  • South Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • Missouri
  • Louisiana
  • Mississippi
  • Georgia
  • Arkansas
  • Florida
  • Tennessee

Symptoms of Cytauxzoon felis
While bobcats, the natural hosts, are typically asymptomatic, domestic cats are not so lucky. After being bitten by a tick carrying this protozoan parasite, domestic cats typically show signs within 5-14 days.

Infected cats often present with:

  • Depression
  • Lethargy
  • Anorexia
  • Fever
  • Dehydration

Unfortunately, the disease progresses quickly and affected cats can die within 2-3 days without treatment.

via Pet Health Network

 

 

Doggie tips for new parents & Black cats/dogs

Planning a family?

Here is an open letter to all of us humans from the dog.

Dear Mom,

I’m almost six months into this being a big brother thing, and I have to say, it’s not at all what I expected.

You being pregnant was the greatest thing that’s ever happened to me. You spent extra time on the couch (read: cuddling). You even grew a perfect pillow for me to rest my head on. You told me you loved me, your firstborn, that you wouldn’t love me any less when my perfect pillow gave way to a squishy, smelly, screaming, tiny human-alien hybrid (oh wait, I didn’t know that part yet).

Continue reading at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kate-awsumb/9-newbaby-gripes-from-the-family-dog_b_7562710.html

Black rescue animals have less chance of finding homes- even at our shelter.

Cats or dogs that wear a black coat are less likely to be adopted and if they are adopted it takes much longer. Is a little superstition really that influential?

A photographer set out to address this issue.

In this Oct. 2013 photo provided by Fred Levy, a black Labrador retriever named Denver poses in Levy's studio in Maynard, Mass. Levy, a pet photographer, first heard about “Black Dog Syndrome” in a 2013 conversation at a dog park. It’s a disputed theory that black dogs are the last to get adopted at shelters, perhaps because of superstition or a perception that they’re aggressive. The idea inspired Levy to take up a photo project on their behalf. (Fred Levy via AP)
In this Oct. 2013 photo provided by Fred Levy, a black Labrador retriever named Denver poses in Levy’s studio in Maynard, Mass. Levy, a pet photographer, first heard about “Black Dog Syndrome” in a 2013 conversation at a dog park. It’s a disputed theory that black dogs are the last to get adopted at shelters, perhaps because of superstition or a perception that they’re aggressive. The idea inspired Levy to take up a photo project on their behalf. (Fred Levy via AP)

It was a summer day at the dog park when Fred Levy, a professional pet photographer, overheard a conversation that he couldn’t shake off.

A woman was talking about “Black Dog Syndrome” — a theory that black dogs are less likely to be adopted than those with lighter coats, perhaps because of superstition or a notion that black dogs are aggressive. Experts debate whether it’s a myth or reality, but it struck Levy.

“A dog shouldn’t be overlooked just because of its coat,” Levy said. “That’s a minor element when it comes to the dog.”

Continue reading at http://news.yahoo.com/pet-photo-series-aims-counter-black-dog-theory-162950844.html

 

Fritz can’t catch, 5 dog poisons that may be in your purse, & interrupting a mating tortoise.

 

2D274908049784-fritz-cant-catch-dog-TODAY-150324.blocks_desktop_large

Fritz is trending right now and it’s for an adorable fail.

Fritz just can’t seem to catch his snacks.

The Today Show featured him and he has his own youtube station! Check him out! http://www.today.com/pets/golden-retriever-fritz-cant-catch-food-thrown-directly-him-2D80566149

Continue reading Fritz can’t catch, 5 dog poisons that may be in your purse, & interrupting a mating tortoise.

DIY Pet Bed, a New Job for Dogs at the Airport, & Awesome Cat Facts.

Hello all!

Today I am sharing a DIY photo and two videos.

I’m loving this DIY cat or dog bed and it’s an upcycle!

No directions as far as words, but it’s pretty self explanatory and seems pretty easy! You could even drop by a Goodwill or Resale shop for a cheap sweater in case it gets destroyed.

image1

 

Next, here’s a video of a new dog job at the airport!

Continue reading DIY Pet Bed, a New Job for Dogs at the Airport, & Awesome Cat Facts.

5 Signs your dog is in pain & A Prank of the Good Kind

Dogs and cats can show us a wide array of emotions, but sometimes those can be missed. Sometimes the emotion that is missed could be a very important one. Here’s an article that covers one of those emotions, pain:

http://theilovedogssite.com/5-signs-your-dog-is-in-pain/?utm_source=FB_CUSA_Pain&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=FB_CUSA_Pain

And a friend share this awesome video with me today. It’s the best and the most kindhearted prank I’ve ever seen!